89% of groundwater pumped is used for irrigation. The paddy and sugarcane consume > 60% of irrigation water," said the survey. According to a report, as compared to the ratio of total used volume of water to the production quantity of world average: India’s rice production is 2020:1325 m3 per tonne (UNESCO 2010). Paddy is a great guzzler, and as compared to flood prone plains of Indo-Gangetic plains of west Bengal and Bihar, paddy takes three times more water in Punjab due to availability of ground water and canal systems. Out of 5.0 million hectares area under cultivation in Punjab the major share is of rice (paddy and basmati 3.0 million hectares, whereas in contrast to 1.23 lakh ha of maize and 2.83lakh ha of cotton, Alike other crops paddy has been reported to be a successful drip feeded crop. Thus, rice cultivation is water intensive; it uses1600 mm per season as per literature, (65 lakh l /ac). But in actuality much more volumes are applied in many delta areas in India (up to 2200 mm, 90 lakh l /ac). The use of micro irrigation accompanied with fertigation has a benefit for rice production. At one side the water consumption is reduced to a great extent when we use drip and at the same time under non-stress situation paddy respond with higher yields. Irrespective of the planting technique, varieties, method, qclimate and location. While rice yields enhancement due to drip-fertigation ranged from 14.7% to 29.9%. (Over that in flood method) averaged upto 11.61 t/ha (2) ability in soil is kept close to field capacity and crop is grown to result in enhanced yields. It’s possible by micro irrigation technologies. The topic is reviewed in view to see the reported and works carried out by drip companies. We believe that results from such effort would lead to an actual extension possibility of that technology in the coming years. Of the 43.8 million ha paddy cultivated in India, even a 10% of it gets into drip irrigation that is4.4 million ha. The impact would be multifold: Substantial saving of irrigation water; meaning irrigating more area under paddy with the available water. Substantial saving of energy; a boon power starved. Increased production of rice; a much-needed requirement for the country. The paper will help to make an awareness that the paddy is not a waterlogged crop and can be successfully grown with Drip irrigation." />
International Journal of Research in Agronomy

Printed Journal  |  Indexed Journal  |  Refereed Journal  |  Peer Reviewed Journal

P-ISSN: 2618-060X, E-ISSN: 2618-0618   |   Impact Factor: RJIF 5.24
International Journal of Research in Agronomy
2022, Vol. 5, Issue 1, Part A

A study on saving water using drip irrigation technologies in paddy and enhancing yield


Parveen Kumar Jain, Ganesh Datt Bhatt and Mahesh Singh

We know that water is essential for growing rice and it requires standing–water for proper growth and successful cultivation. The practice probably started when under prevailing conditions the farmers has tweaked rice seedling to grow in accumulated water. The first records of rice cultivation projects it as a dry seeded crop grown in ends of high land and forests cleared for shifting cultivation. It’s in China that the process of puddling soil and transplanting seedlings began in low-lying area and river valleys. As transplanting gives a head–start for rice seedlings in their fight with weeds, this method took an easy route of acceptance in other parts of the world especially in South Asia where originally rice is grown under dry land conditions. But the current scenario is entirely looking for water saving technologies and the aim has been shifted from 'crop productivity' to 'irrigation/water efficiency'. This can be by micro- irrigation that can improve the water use efficiency," stated the survey. The issue of the growth of water-saving /intensive crops in the agriculture of the country. “Around >89% of groundwater pumped is used for irrigation. The paddy and sugarcane consume > 60% of irrigation water," said the survey. According to a report, as compared to the ratio of total used volume of water to the production quantity of world average: India’s rice production is 2020:1325 m3 per tonne (UNESCO 2010).
Paddy is a great guzzler, and as compared to flood prone plains of Indo-Gangetic plains of west Bengal and Bihar, paddy takes three times more water in Punjab due to availability of ground water and canal systems. Out of 5.0 million hectares area under cultivation in Punjab the major share is of rice (paddy and basmati 3.0 million hectares, whereas in contrast to 1.23 lakh ha of maize and 2.83lakh ha of cotton, Alike other crops paddy has been reported to be a successful drip feeded crop. Thus, rice cultivation is water intensive; it uses1600 mm per season as per literature, (65 lakh l /ac). But in actuality much more volumes are applied in many delta areas in India (up to 2200 mm, 90 lakh l /ac).
The use of micro irrigation accompanied with fertigation has a benefit for rice production. At one side the water consumption is reduced to a great extent when we use drip and at the same time under non-stress situation paddy respond with higher yields. Irrespective of the planting technique, varieties, method, qclimate and location. While rice yields enhancement due to drip-fertigation ranged from 14.7% to 29.9%. (Over that in flood method) averaged upto 11.61 t/ha (2) ability in soil is kept close to field capacity and crop is grown to result in enhanced yields. It’s possible by micro irrigation technologies.
The topic is reviewed in view to see the reported and works carried out by drip companies. We believe that results from such effort would lead to an actual extension possibility of that technology in the coming years. Of the 43.8 million ha paddy cultivated in India, even a 10% of it gets into drip irrigation that is4.4 million ha. The impact would be multifold: Substantial saving of irrigation water; meaning irrigating more area under paddy with the available water. Substantial saving of energy; a boon power starved. Increased production of rice; a much-needed requirement for the country.
The paper will help to make an awareness that the paddy is not a waterlogged crop and can be successfully grown with Drip irrigation.
Pages : 13-18 | 149 Views | 86 Downloads
How to cite this article:
Parveen Kumar Jain, Ganesh Datt Bhatt, Mahesh Singh. A study on saving water using drip irrigation technologies in paddy and enhancing yield. Int J Res Agron 2022;5(1):13-18. DOI: 10.33545/2618060X.2022.v5.i1a.90